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Tag Archives: real estate

German Federal Court: Property Sellers Who Withhold Usage History Risk Liability

FCJ decision finds that mere suspicion of contamination resulting from a sold property’s past use constitutes a defect. By Patrick Braasch and Christian Thiele The German Federal Court of Justice (FCJ) has ruled that an abstract suspicion of contamination resulting from a sold property’s past use already constitutes a material defect — irrespective of the … Continue Reading

Real Estate Transfer Tax: Putting an End to Share Deals?

The Conference of the German Ministers of Finance has announced measures against so-called share deal structures following the conclusion of the respective technical federal-state working group. By Tobias Klass Background So-called share deal structures have been the focus of German political debate about real estate transfer tax (RETT) for some time. The coalition agreement already … Continue Reading

Recent Developments in the German W&I Insurance Market

Increased competition among insurers and improved policy terms suggest the German W&I insurance market is becoming more favourable to investors. By Christian Thiele In real estate transactions, buyers and sellers naturally pursue conflicting interests when negotiating a sale and purchase agreement. On the one hand, sellers will strive to achieve the highest possible purchase price, … Continue Reading

Leaving Germany? Cross-Border Migration of German Real Estate Companies

Cross-border migration of German real estate companies is generally possible, however its admissibility must be determined on a case-by-case basis. By Christian Thiele International real estate investors continue to favour German real estate, however, the same does not always apply to German real estate companies. International real estate investors, for instance, often find German capital … Continue Reading

UK Government Focuses on Real Estate and the Digital Economy in Autumn 2017 Budget

By Karl Mah and Sean Finn Against a stormy backdrop of government instability and Brexit uncertainty, the 2017 Budget was always unlikely to rock the boat. The Chancellor chose not to launch a sweeping attack on “tax avoiders” in light of the public outrage over the Paradise Papers, instead targeting announcements in this area at specific perceived abuses. … Continue Reading
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