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Category Archives: Dispute Resolution

Dispute Resolution – including bribery & corruption, fraud & white collar crime, arbitration, litigation

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European Court of Justice Delivers Victory for EU Transparency and Accountability

Landmark ruling requires the European Commission to disclose impact assessments used as a basis for its legislative decision-making process. By Antonio Morales and Rosa Espín The Grand Chamber of the Court of Justice of the European Union recently issued a landmark judgment finding that impact assessments should be considered public documents. This decision sets a … Continue Reading

UK Serious Fraud Office Director Outlines Priorities in Keynote Speech

New director Lisa Osofsky confirms her focus on cross-border and corporate cooperation. By Stuart Alford QC, Nate Seltzer, and Clare Nida On 3 September 2018, in her first speech, after only one week as head of the UK’s Serious Fraud Office (SFO), Lisa Osofsky laid out her plans for the agency. Upon announcement of her appointment, … Continue Reading

Internal Investigations Protected By Privilege Once More?

English Court of Appeal reaffirms privilege over internal investigation documents prepared in contemplation of litigation. By Jon Holland, Andrea Monks, Stuart Alford QC, Nate Seltzer, Dan Smith, and James Fagan In a much anticipated decision, the Court of Appeal has reaffirmed legal privilege protection for documents prepared during internal investigations (e.g., interview notes, forensic accounting … Continue Reading

English Court Refuses to Extend Time for Serving a Claim Form

Claimants and practitioners must be mindful of the period in which a claim form must be served after filing. By Oliver E. Browne and Kavan M. Bakhda In Viner v. Volkswagen Group Limited [2018] EWHC 2006 (QB) Senior Master Fontaine refused the claimants’ application to extend time to serve a claim form that had been … Continue Reading

German Federal Court: Property Sellers Who Withhold Usage History Risk Liability

FCJ decision finds that mere suspicion of contamination resulting from a sold property’s past use constitutes a defect. By Patrick Braasch and Christian Thiele The German Federal Court of Justice (FCJ) has ruled that an abstract suspicion of contamination resulting from a sold property’s past use already constitutes a material defect — irrespective of the … Continue Reading

English Court Issues Anti-Arbitration Injunction Restraining Lebanese Arbitration Proceedings

Judgment clarifies the exceptional circumstances in which anti-arbitration injunctions against foreign-seated arbitrations might be granted. By Oliver E. Browne and Robert Price In Sabbagh v Khoury, Justice Knowles in the High Court issued an anti-arbitration injunction to restrain arbitration proceedings commenced in Lebanon on the basis that, contrary to the Lebanese arbitral tribunal’s findings, the … Continue Reading

English Court Cannot Issue Anti-Suit Injunctions Restraining Other EU Court Proceedings

Judgement clarifies that the Brussels Recast Regulation does not reverse the West Tankers decision. By Oliver E. Browne and Robert Price In Nori Holdings v Bank Otkritie, Justice Males in the High Court issued an anti-suit injunction to restrain court proceedings commenced in Russia in breach of an arbitration clause, but refused to issue an … Continue Reading

UK Court of Appeal Confirms Rigidity of Part 36 Convention

Decision clarifies the court’s limit of discretion in departing from Part 36 cost consequence rules, even if a party behaved dishonestly. By Oliver Middleton The Court of Appeal has overturned a decision at first instance in which a claimant accused of dishonesty was punished by way having to pay not only the usual costs for … Continue Reading

A Significant Win for ISPs: UK Supreme Court rules on blocking order compliance costs

Favourable Supreme Court decision for ISPs finding they do not have to bear costs of complying with blocking orders. By Oliver Middleton Historically, internet service providers (ISPs) that have been ordered to block access to websites have had to bear their own costs of compliance on the basis that it was seen as being part … Continue Reading

UK To Provide Compensation for Overseas Victims of Economic Crimes

A new UK policy establishes a commitment to providing victims of overseas bribery with compensation; however, important questions remain that will impact implementation. By Stuart Alford QC, Nathan H. Seltzer, Joseph M. Bargnesi, Laila Hamzi, Clare Nida, and Christopher M. Ting The UK’s Serious Fraud Office (SFO), the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) and the National … Continue Reading

Cartelised Products: In or Out of EEA? Only a Trial Will Tell

England may become an increasingly attractive forum for follow on damages claims, particularly those involving indirect cartelised product purchases initially acquired outside EEA the in wake of iiyama decisions. By Oliver E. Browne and Hayley M. Pizzey Summary The English Court of Appeal has held iiyama’s two claims against cathode ray tube (CRT) cartelists and … Continue Reading

UK Supreme Court: NOM Clauses Invalidate Oral Variations of Contracts

Judgment confirms the effectiveness of contractual provisions that prevent the parties from varying their contract orally. By Oliver E. Browne and Robert Price The Supreme Court of the United Kingdom recently held that an oral variation of a contract was invalid due to a No Oral Modification (NOM) clause contained in the contract. This clause … Continue Reading

English Court Provides Welcome Clarification on Key Arbitral Award Issues

The decision confirms that UNCITRAL Rules do not impose a higher procedural fairness burden than the Arbitration Act and that the foreign act of state doctrine applies in arbitrations. By Oliver E. Browne The Commercial Court considered various challenges to an arbitral award under the Arbitration Act 1996 (the Act) in Reliance Industries Ltd and … Continue Reading

English Court of Appeal Re-Affirms Pro-Enforcement Stance Toward Foreign Arbitral Awards

Decision encourages a deferential approach to enforcing foreign awards in England and confirms narrow interpretation of the public policy exception under the New York Convention. By Oliver E. Browne and Samuel Pape The English Court of Appeal has confirmed the enforcement of a China International Economic and Trade Arbitration Commission (CIETAC) award rendered in Beijing, … Continue Reading

Court Rules that Arbitrators Must Disclose Related or Overlapping Appointments

Arbitrators should disclose subsequent appointments to related arbitration proceedings, particularly if cases materially overlap. By Oliver E. Browne and Robert Price In the Halliburton v Chubb ruling, the Court of Appeal held that an arbitrator who did not disclose subsequent appointments to related arbitration proceedings should have disclosed those subsequent appointments both as a matter … Continue Reading

Is Good Faith a Bad Choice Under English Law?

By Oliver Browne Although there remains no widely accepted definition of good faith under English law, and English law has committed itself to no overriding principle of good faith, English law has developed piecemeal solutions in response to demonstrated problems of unfairness. The variety of these solutions, and the pace with which they are being … Continue Reading

High Court Decision in Norske Skog: Puh! (Norwegian for Phew!)

Ruling confirms majority noteholder should not be disenfranchised from voting By Simon J. Baskerville, Sophie J. Lamb QC, Bradley J. Weyland, and Eleanor M. Scogings The English High Court held that it had jurisdiction in a cross-border dispute involving the Norske Skog group (Norske Skog), and confirmed that a majority noteholder did not “control” the … Continue Reading

English High Court Applies New “Range of Factors” Test to Defence of Illegality

New “range of factors” test suggests broad use in future civil matters and fairer, more nuanced outcomes. By Daniel Smith and Alanna Andrew The High Court has applied the new fact-sensitive “range of factors” test in Harb v Aziz[i] to determine whether a defendant to a civil claim can rely on the claimant’s wrongdoing to … Continue Reading

Jukes: English Appellate Decision on Litigation Privilege in Internal Investigations

By Stuart Alford QC, Daniel Smith and Clare Nida The English Court of Appeal provides further guidance, approving ENRC, on when litigation privilege will not apply to information gathering materials. The English Court of Appeal (Criminal Division) has ruled that litigation privilege does not apply to a statement an employee makes to his employer’s solicitors … Continue Reading

Bilta v. RBS: When Will Litigation Privilege Apply to Information Gathering in Internal Investigations

High Court decision provides practical lessons for companies conducting investigations. By Stuart Alford QC, Daniel Smith and Clare Nida The English High Court has reconfirmed that litigation privilege can apply to information gathering in internal investigations. Specifically, lawyers must have engaged in the information gathering for the dominant purpose of conducting litigation, and this can include … Continue Reading

Parties Must Take Care to Avoid Risk of Defective Service in Arbitration

By Robert Price and Eleanor Scogings Two recent English court decisions provide useful reminders that parties to arbitration agreements must take care to properly serve arbitration proceedings on the other party. In doing so, parties will avoid the risk of the court setting aside an award on the grounds that service was defective and that the … Continue Reading

ICC Court Clarifies Summary Dismissal Procedure in Arbitration

By Charles Rae In a revised practice note, the ICC Court of Arbitration has provided guidance on the procedure for determining applications for summary dismissal of unmeritorious claims and defences in arbitrations conducted under the ICC Rules. The revisions are important because the ICC Rules do not otherwise contain a process for dismissing claims or … Continue Reading

UK Budgets for Fintech Growth

By Andrew Moyle and Stuart Davis The UK government’s 2017 Autumn Budget included some measures of particular interest for fintech firms, demonstrating the government’s continued commitment to making the UK a world-leading fintech hub. The government has provided only scant detail on these measures at present, but no doubt firms will be watching closely to … Continue Reading
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